Infertility Stress, How you can beat it.





Many couples experience infertility stress this is relatively normal, everybody has concerns, it just depends on what aspect you are concerned about and how deeply this is affecting you. Infertility stress in occasional cases can play a role in ovulation, by lowering your body function affecting your menstrual cycle. Although stress can delay ovulation, it should not stop you getting pregnant provided you are making love every two to three days throughout your cycle, and especially near your O-day as this will optimize your chances of success.

If you have completely stopped ovulating due to infertility stress which your doctor has correctly diagnosed, you may well be treated with hormone therapy to help give your reproductive system a bump start or other therapies such as biofeedback to help decrease negative response to your infertility stress.

But lowering your stress levels is easier said than done. Read on to discover some key findings and recommendations on how to deal with infertility stress and to improve your fertility and reduce stress all at the same time. By Clicking Here

If you are under psychological stress, it can affect your relationship and is likely to reduce your sex drive. So if, as a result, you do not make love as often as usual, this will affect your chances of getting pregnant. Having fertility problems and going through tests and treatment can in itself be a stressful process.

It may put a strain on you individually and as a couple, it may also affect your menstrual cycle, even make you skip a few cycles. Every cycle that you skip means one less chance to get pregnant, as you are not making any eggs that month.

Your doctor or gynecologist should inform you and your partner that if either of you experiences infertility stress that it can affect a couple’s relationship and is likely to reduce libido and frequency of intercourse, which can contribute to infertility problems and marital problems.

Timed intercourse has been found to be an emotionally stressful intervention in the initial evaluation of infertility. (1) However, for the minority of couples who find it difficult to have frequent sexual intercourse, the prediction of ovulation using LH kits can be useful.

Many of large medical institutions acknowledge that there is definite relationship between stress and fertility problems, that it is complex and (1) individual responses to stressful situations will vary. Three cohort studies have reported an association between work-related stress and a lower probability of conception in women. (6 – 8)However, the association in men is less clear. (9-10)

Psychological stress can affect a couple’s relationship and libido, which may impact upon their chance of conception. A higher frequency of male sexual disturbances including loss of libido and a decrease in the frequency of sexual intercourse has been observed in couples undergoing fertility diagnostic and treatment procedures.(11-13)



There are things that can be done here by women taking the lead, usually having that intimate conversation with their partner, establishing trust about a delicate subject and finding out what arouses him and hopefully get him back on the track with a confidence boost or even by wearing something special in bed to turn him on.



Infertility is regarded as an upsetting and difficult life experience for some women,(14, 16) with a sub population of women reporting elevated levels of anxiety and depression in some studies;(14, 16-24) however, another study (25) did not find such an association. In one study, the psychological symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with infertility were found to be similar to those associated with other serious medical conditions such as heart disease, cancer, hypertension and infection with HIV. (26)

A study in Sweden reported that almost 50% of women said they needed professional help and support to deal with their anxiety and problems in their marital relationship two years after tubal reconstructive surgery.(27)

Couples should be informed that stress in the male and/or female partner can affect the couple’s relationship and is likely to reduce libido and frequency of intercourse which can contribute to infertility stress problems. People who experience fertility problems should be informed that they might find it helpful to contact a fertility support group.

People who experience infertility stress problems should be offered counseling because fertility problems themselves, and the investigation and treatment of fertility problems, can cause psychological stress. Counseling should be offered before, during and after investigation and treatment, irrespective of the outcome of these procedures. Someone who is not directly involved in the management of the couple’s fertility problems should provide counseling with experience of infertility stress management.

On the other hand, a personalized stress reduction plan may help. One that minimizes the impact of stress in both long and short term. Click here for your personalized Stress Reduction Plan

People preparing for medical treatment that is likely to make them infertile should be offered counseling from someone who is independent of the treatment unit to help them cope with the stress and the potential physical and psychological implications for themselves, their partners and any potential children resulting from cryostorage of gametes and/or embryos.

If you are under psychological stress, it can affect your relationship and is likely to reduce your sex drive. So if, as a result, you do not make love as often as usual, this once again may also affect your chances of getting pregnant. Click here for your personalized

Stress Reduction Plan.

Support counseling aims to give emotional support at times of particular stress , for example, when there is a repeated failure to achieve a pregnancy leading to infertility stress. This may occur at any stage before, during and after donation or treatment.



The emotional consequences of anxiety and infertility stress can be reduced by adequate provision of clear information about all aspects of investigations and treatment, involving both partners as an integral part of the management plan. The impact of psychological infertility stress should be acknowledged throughout the care of the couple with fertility problems with offers of counseling.

Counseling involves a professional relationship between a qualified counselor and a patient, who may be an individual, a couple or a group of people. This relationship is contained within a formal counseling contract agreed and understood by both parties.

The counselor has no other relationship with the client. Nurses, doctors and scientists in fertility clinics should offer support and emotional help to couples as part of their professional role, but it is necessary for them recognize infertility stress and use counseling skills within their existing role.(33)

Four surveys have reported that most patients feel that access to a support group and counseling would be beneficial. (2,22,28,29) Some felt that psychological support should be available at all stages of infertility treatment, investigation and including recognizing infertility stress. (4)

An unpublished survey (29) found that few doctors offered counseling or identified methods of support, but two-thirds of couples attending an infertility clinic said they would accept psychological assistance if offered. (22) In another study, 70% of patients said they would request counseling if it were available free of charge, which can be the case in the UK. (3) Despite this, overall uptake of counseling is low at between 18% - 25%. (2, 4, 30) It has been suggested that less distressed patients may not wish to receive counseling, and some may cope well with support from their spouses and family. (31)

Two-thirds of patients undergoing IVF treatment reported reading newspaper or magazine articles and watching television programs about the psychological aspects of infertility, even though few participated in a support group or sought counseling before treatment.(32) This suggests that, for some patients, information about local and national support groups and booklets on the psychological aspects of treatment, in addition to medical information, may be beneficial.

Recommendations for dealing with infertility stress

  • Discuss what is making you stressed with your partner, stress increases when you hold everything in.
  • Try to focus on the big picture try to remember that the odds are not completely against you.
  • Also don’t lose sight of the rest of your life, you have loads of other things going on, so make time for friends, family, your partner your hobbies, you still have a life that started before you decided to get pregnant and you still do.
  • Enroll in local support groups.
  • People who experience infertility stress problems should be informed that they might find it helpful to contact a fertility support group.
  • Your doctor should be able to offer counseling because fertility problems themselves, and the investigation and treatment of fertility problems, can cause psychological stress leading to infertility stress.
  • Counseling should be offered before, during and after investigation and treatment, irrespective of the outcome of these procedures and by someone who is not directly involved in the management of the couple’s fertility problems should provide counseling, so ask about it
  • There have been a lot of success in reducing infertility stress by doing yoga exercises as you focus on you and your body and not your problems and also considerable success in combating infertility stress by using alternative treatments such as essential oils and herbs.

  • References

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